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How Does This Matter To Me?

Meet Tony Meet Amanda Meet Phillip
Under 30, Full Time, Single Under 30, Part Time, Married
/ No Kids
Under 30, Unemployed, Single
Tony is a central Illinois resident who is single and earns $40,000 per year at a full time job. He has health insurance benefits available through his employer and has no children. In general, employees like Tony who are offered insurance through work are not eligible for subsidized exchange coverage, so long as their insurance meets specified requirements.

Tony would only be eligible for subsidized exchange coverage if his income is between 1 and 4 times the federal poverty level and he pays more than 9.5% of his income for coverage through the insurance offered by his employer.
Amanda is a central Illinois resident who works part time and earns 25,000 per year. As a part time employee, she doesn't have access to employer supported health insurance. In cases like Amanda's, members of her family may qualify for Medicaid.

Her household income in 2014 is 161% of poverty level, so a typical unsubsidized annual health insurance premium in 2014 would be $2,877. Amanda would likely qualify for a government subsidy, and the maximum % of her income she'd have to pay is 4.51%, or in Amanda's case $1,129 per year, or 39% of the overall premium.

She could also receive a government tax credit subsidy of up to $1,749, which covers the other 61% of the overall premium.
Phillip is a central Illinois resident who is under 30, unemployed and single. Since he's unemployed, he may qualify for Medicaid or lower costs on Marketplace insurance based on your income. Medicaid provides coverage to millions of Americans with limited incomes or disabilities.

A law signed this summer means about 342,000 low-income Illinoisans will be newly eligible for government-sponsored health insurance through Medicaid starting in January of 2014. People in Illinois who earn up $15,860 annually for an individual or $32,500 for a family of four will be eligible for the subsidized coverage.
Meet Michelle Meet Jennifer Meet Jordan
31-64, Full Time, Married
/No Kids
31-64, Full Time, Married
w/Kids
31-64, Part Time, Married
/No Kids
Michelle is a central Illinois resident who is 35 years, married with no kids and has a full time job that offers benefits and pays $60,000 per year. In general, employees like Michelle who are offered insurance through work are not eligible for subsidized exchange coverage, so long as their insurance meets specified requirements.

She would only be eligible for subsidized exchange coverage if her income is between 1 and 4 times the federal poverty level (which in Michelle's case would be 62,040) and you would have to pay more than 9.5% (or $3,900 in Michelle?s case) of her household income for coverage through the insurance offered by your employer.
Jennifer is a married mother of two who lives on a household income of $90,000 per year. She has a full time job that offers health insurance. In general, employees like Jennifer who are offered insurance through work are not eligible for subsidized exchange coverage, so long as their insurance meets specified requirements.

She would only be eligible for subsidized exchange coverage if your income is between 1 and 4 times the federal poverty level (which in Jennifer's case is currently $94,200) and she would have to pay more than 9.5% of her household income (which would be $8,550) for her own coverage through the insurance offered by your employer.
Jordan is married, but has no children. Her part time job offers a salary of $35,000, but no benefits. Her husband's self employed and receives no benefits either. He earns about $45,000 per year, for a total household income of $80,000 annually.

Because their income is more than 4 times the poverty level, Jordan and her husband would not qualify for subsidized exchange coverage. So their anticipated premium amount in the Health Insurance marketplace (given an average coverage plan) would be $5,142 (which equals 6.43% of their household income and covers 100% of the overall premium).
Meet Tom Meet Nicholas Meet Evelyn
31-64, Unemployed, Single 65+, Full Time, Married
/No Kids
65+, Retired, Single
Tom is 37 years old, single and unemployed. Based on a new law, Tom will be eligible for Medicaid on January 1, 2014. On July 22, 2013, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed a new law that extends Medicaid eligibility to nearly all low-income Illinois residents effective January 1, 2014.

Until now, low-income adults, ages 19 through 65 have not been eligible for Medicaid. These people qualified only if they were totally disabled or caring for minor children.

The federal Affordable Care Act allows states to cover this long left-out group in their Medicaid programs and receive 100% federal funding for the costs. Smoking status is not taken into account in Medicaid eligibility.
Nicholas is 65 years old, but still holds down a full time job. He's married, but his kids have moved away from the home. Because Nicholas is 65, he's eligible for Medicare, which isn't part of the Health Insurance Marketplace, so he doesn't need to do anything different in light of the new law. He is considered covered.

The Marketplace won't affect Medicare choices, and benefits won't be changing. Nicholas won't have to make any changes.
Evelyn is a 67 year old widow who is retired. Evelyn is enrolled in Medicare, which isn't part of the Health Insurance Marketplace, so she doesn't need to do anything. She's considered covered.

The Marketplace won't affect her Medicare choices, and your benefits won't be changing. Additionally, Evelyn can't get a Marketplace plan in addition to her Medicare. In fact, it's against the law for someone to sell or issue a Marketplace policy to someone the seller knows has Medicare. She also can't choose a Marketplace policy instead of Medicare.

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