Driver's ed classes could include traffic stop training

ILLINOIS - ILLINOIS  --  A traffic stop may seem simple. But it can sometimes be the most dangerous part of being an officer. That's why lawmakers want to teach students how to talk to police if they're stopped.

A proposal would make it mandatory to learn in drivers education.

"If there's any problems there take it to the court system. Don't get into an argument with the officer," said Park Chief Laimutis "Limey" Nargelenas.

In the latest numbers from IDOT the state made more than 2 million traffic stops in 2014.

"We also do a lot of community programs explaining to people when you get stopped what's your expectations should be," said Nargelenas.

Nargelenas said the interaction between drivers and police needs to change.

"Flex your rights so when you're stop as a citizen you know exactly what your rights are, and what you need to do when a police officer ask if they can search the car."

Everyone across the country has seen the videos of recent traffic stops gone wrong.

Nargelenas is hoping legislation could change the outcome.

"From the police department we are willing to put on his program, we're going to go to the schools wherever it's necessary and provide this type of information."

Just last months lawmakers sent a bill to the governor asking just for that. It would required driver's education courses to include instruction concerning police procedures for traffic stops. And people seem to agree.

"Just in case, just double check yourself. If they do pull you over for whatever reason they'll tell you exactly what; because they're going to ask you,  you know why I pulled you over, " said Nathan Cormier.

Drivers said as long as it's not a separate class then maybe it's a smart move.

"I would say getting along is common sense you can add it to a class as just a quick topic," said Cormier.

The implementation would be added to the curriculum for those under age 18.

Which includes a demonstration of the proper actions.

"So that when somebody is in involved in they're being stopped by police officer that they realize this is what's going to happen this is what you need to do."

If the governor signs this bill, the changes will take place during the 2017 and 2018 school year.

The ACLU has a list of rights for drivers when being pulled over.

 

You have the right to remain silent.  If you want to exercise that right, say so out loud. You have the right to refuse to consent to a search of yourself, your car or your home. If you are not under arrest, you have the right to calmly leave.


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