Governor takes aim at gun violence

Governor takes aim at gun violence

ILLINOIS -- An Independence Day shootout has Governor Quinn taking aim at gun violence. But, his stance could come with a cost for gun owners.
ILLINOIS -- An Independence Day shootout has Governor Quinn taking aim at gun violence. But, his stance could come with a cost for gun owners. WCIA-3's Alex Davis keeps us Connected to the Capitol.

The governor is pushing for passage of the Illinois Public Safety Act. It would ban certain guns. Not everyone is in favor of it.

During an emotional visit to Chicago's Morgan Park Neighborhood Sunday, Governor Quinn called on legislators to pass a bill banning assault weapons and some large-capacity magazines and clips. He says they're one reason too many innocent people are dying.

"We've got to do something in their memory to make sure we protect the public's safety."

But, not everyone thinks targeting guns and ammo is the answer.

"Chicago has the toughest gun laws in the United States and they have the most fatalities of anywhere else in the United States."

Representative Raymond Poe says the main focus should be on criminals. Tom Shafer agrees. He's the founder of GunsSaveLife.com and feels Quinn's motive is just another political move.

"When you reach a politician that says a gun ban will work to reduce crime, he's desperate."

He says crime is always going to be around.

"Crime is ongoing, multifaceted, horrendously deep, social issue."

Shafer says, Quinn is using the shootings to gain support on an emotional issue, but he doesn't think legislation is the route to go.

"Real legislation is thought out over long-term with a lot of debate, a lot of input, a lot of input, a lot of committee hearings. It makes for better law."

And that lawmakers should really think before they act.

"If you rush to a law, you pass a terrible law."

The Illinois Public Safety Act was introduced in the spring. The bill states anyone who has these types of weapons could keep them if they had them before it was enacted, but going forward, they couldn't transfer or sell them to anyone other than family members.
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