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House committee grills IHSA's Hickman

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Illinois High School Association executive director Marty Hickman was under the microscope Tuesday as a House committee began it's hearings, looking into the organization that oversees nearly all high school sports and activities in the state. The House's Elementary and Secondary Education committee met Tuesday at the state capitol in Springfield. Hickman was there, along with other IHSA administrators and some members of their board. While the IHSA is a private, not-for-profit company, the committee says it has the right to investigate because the IHSA deals so closely with public schools, who receive state funding.
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Illinois High School Association executive director Marty Hickman was under the microscope Tuesday as a House committee began it's hearings, looking into the organization that oversees nearly all high school sports and activities in the state.  The House's Elementary and Secondary Education committee met Tuesday at the state capitol in Springfield.  Hickman was there, along with other IHSA administrators and some members of their board.  While the IHSA is a private, not-for-profit company, the committee says it has the right to investigate because the IHSA deals so closely with public schools, who receive state funding.

Some of the topics committee members asked Hickman about were where the IHSA's money comes from and where it is spent.  They also wanted to know how much of the IHSA's income gets invested back into the schools.  They also asked about the diversity of the IHSA's Board of Directors and staff, as well as how decisions are made in regards to which schools host state playoff events and how the bidding process works for state finals events.

Champaign Central athletic director John Woods was one of more than 50 high school administrators at Tuesday's hearing in support of the IHSA.

"There's advisory committees for each and every sport," Woods said.  "They're well represented across the state, and I think the first step is communicating with the advisory committees.  If there's issues and concerns that's usually the first place to go.  Marty volunteered today to meet with that committee at any time.  All they had to do was call, and I think today there were a lot more people there than were necessary.  It was much more formal than necessary."
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