Museum holds special memories for Our Town

Museum holds special memories for Our Town

Update: 5:10 pm, 8/8/14, Friday WESTVILLE -- You can't drive through Our Town without seeing this attraction.
Update: 5:10 pm, 8/8/14, Friday
WESTVILLE -- You can't drive through Our Town without seeing this attraction. Sandy McElroy is here to discuss the historic caboose.
Original: 3:25, 8/4/14, Monday
WESTVILLE -- For years, the train depot in Our Town has been one of the main hubs around the village. Now, it's a museum preserving the past for future generations. WCIA-3's Anna Carrera meets one man who helped keep the project on the right track.

Back in the day, miners helped put Westville on map.

"There was a lot of coal in this area and there was a lot of potential here," said George Delhaye, who is a chairman for the depot.  

When all that started, C & EI Railroad put one of its depots along what's now Route 150. People came from all over the world to land a job.

"Westville was in Ripley's Believe It Or Not, for being a small community with 37 different nationalities," said Delhaye.

One of the workers who came from overseas was Delhaye's dad.

"As a child, I came to this depot and met my dad when he came from the coal mines," said Delhaye.

A lot of what's left there now is the same as it was back then, reminding Delhaye of things which happened decades ago.

"We would go to Stefani's Tavern and we would go in as kids with their dad, have a pop and they would have their beer," said Delhaye. "There's a lot of memories here."

Not just memories about coal and trains.

"We have a lot of history here in Westville," said Delhaye.

Sports, servicemen and many others have a space at the old depot.

"We're always looking for things from the Westville area," said Delhaye. 

Even though there's not as much action there anymore, the caboose out front marks the spot where many other trains used to stop in Our Town.

Delhaye says when he would wait for his dad, sometimes he couldn't pick him out from the crowd because the miners were covered head-to-toe in coal dust, so his dad would usually have to find him.
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