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Posting ballots online is illegal

CHAMPAIGN COUNTY -- Some people turn to social media when they want to share something with friends and family, but that can be a problem on Election Day.
CHAMPAIGN COUNTY -- Some people turn to social media when they want to share something with friends and family, but that can be a problem on Election Day.

Some people chose to take pictures of their ballots and posted them to Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. But you're not supposed to do that. These are issues election officials said they've never seen before.

Instagram wasn't even around during the last presidential election. That and other programs are making it even more difficult to keep votes completely anonymous.

Technology plays a big part on Election day. Volunteers use it to scan and count ballots. Now some voters are using it to show off who they picked.

"I feel like it's a way to get your opinion and voice out there and more people read that and are swayed or agree or disagree, so I feel like that's got a huge impact now," said University of Illinois senior Abby Brandolino.

Instagram was flooded with thousands of pictures on Election Day. Many of those showed real ballots with real election information.

In today's technological world, people take pictures and videos to share with their friends all the time. But the state election board said if you take a picture of your ballot to share on social media, that can be considered a felony. State election officials said anyone who votes so it can be seen by someone else is breaking the law. And some agree that sharing your ballot is crossing the line.

"I'm kind of old school," said UI senior Nick Shine. "I think you should probably keep that to yourself. You shouldn't be influencing other people. I think it's important to tell people to vote but not who to vote for."

Election officials don't want voters to be swayed or vote a certain way just because someone else is. But some said that's not the point.

"I have my own personal beliefs and I don't think someone's opinion or showing me a photo of their ballot is going to change my mind about anything," said Brandolino.

And even if it's against the law, some said it's hard to enforce.

"We're always going to be able to text and take pictures where we're at, so I think having it illegal really doesn't do anything," said Shine.

Election officials said they're not looking to arrest or fine people. They said they have called or sent emails when they see those ballot pictures and they ask that you take them down. 
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